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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Chuck Grassley
U.S. Senator, Judiciary Committee Ranking Member
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
instances where the NSA employees abused their authorities. It was heartening to see how few cases of intentional misconduct exists but on the other hand it's alarming to know that the possibility of employees engaging in such behavior turns out to be very real. The NSA inspectors general's response to my letter reflected that many of these cases were referred to the Department of Justice for possible criminal prosecution.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Before these unauthorized disclosures we were always conservative about discussing the specifics of our collection programs, based on the truism that the more adversaries know about what we are doing the more they can avoid our surveillance. But the disclosures, for better or for worse, have lowered the threshold for discussing these matters in public. So to the degree we can discuss them, we will.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Would you agree that the 54 cases that keep getting cited by the administration were not all plots, and of the 54 – only 13 had some nexus to the U.S. Would you agree with that? Yes or no. Alexander: Yes.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
In our last hearing, Deputy Director Inglis’s testimony stated that there is only one example of a case where, but for the use of Section 215 bulk phone records collection, terrorist activity was stopped. Is Mr. Inglis right? Alexander: He is right. I believe he said two, Chairman. I may have that wrong but I think he said two. And I would like to point out it could have only applied…
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander: He is right. I believe he said two, Chairman. I may have that wrong but I think he said two. And I would like to point out it could have only applied to 13 of the cases because of the 54 terrorist plots or events, only 13 occurred in the U.S. Business rcords FISA was only used in 12 Leahy: I understand that but what I worry about is that some of the statements that all is well, and we have these overstatements of what is going on, we are talking about massive, massive, massive collection. We are told that we have to that to protect us.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
We get far more in the newspaper and we get a crossword puzzle too but we get more in the newspapers than we do in the classified re-things that you give us. According to the article the NSA associates and locates Americans now if it's accurate it appears to contradict earlier representation that the NSA does not compile dossiers of files on the wrecking people.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Is the NSA compiling profiles or dossiers of the American people? Clapper: In every case for valid foreign intelligence purposes. Let me go to General Alexander. Alexander: Those reports are inaccurate and wrong. Leahy: So the New York Times is wrong in its article? Alexander: Absolutely. Here are the facts. What they have taken is the fact that we do take data to enrich it. What is not in front of the statements is the word foreign. Foreign information to understand what the foreign nexis is of the problems that we are looking at.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
What if anything is accurate in the New York Times article? Alexander: the accuracy is that Secretary of Defense and the Attorney General did approve the supplemental procedures governing communications metadata analysis in 2009. What that allows us to do is use metadata that we have acquired under executive order 12333, and chain, whether it's phone records or e-mails, through U.S selectors to figure out social networks abroad.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Is what you're doing being reviewed by the FISA court? Alexander: Not in all cases. Some of these cases that deal with executive order 12333 are not reviewed by the FISA Court. Those that fall under business records 215, 702, 3 and 4 would be. So these would not be reviewed, but they are reviewed by the administration and audited by our people.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
technology that’s able to piece together data while protecting rights. I listen to this program being described as a surveillance program. It is not -- there is no content collected by the NSA. There are bits of data, location, telephone numbers that can be queried when there's reasonable articulable suspicion. If it looks like it’s something for an individual in the country, it then goes to the FBI
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